Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Bees attic Cape May

Bees attic Cape May

Bees attic Cape May, 30,000 bees found in attic, Two homeowners in this quaint seaside town were suspicious when they routinely saw swarms of bees flying toward a vent on an upper floor of their home. After investigating, they discovered a huge number of bees in their attic – 30,000 to be exact. The couple promptly called someone to remove the bees Victoria Clayton and Richard White, who live in a former bed-and-breakfast in Cape May, New Jersey, found an enormous three foot by 2 foot honeycomb and nearly 30,000 bees in their attic crawl space.

They were noticing an unusual large amount of bees in the their garden, as well as a steady line of bee’s headed for the third-floor laundry vent. After they did some research, they found out that these were honeybees that pollinate food crops.
The couple didn’t want to exterminate the bees since it’s illegal to kill honey bees in New Jersey, so they called Gary Schempp, founder of the insect rescue group Busy Bees NJ. “Some home owners who are not familiar with the bees may think it is best to spray them, but that is the worst thing you can do, and not just because it’s illegal. Once they are sprayed or controlled or damaged in someway then all that nectar, all that honey, all that comb, and all that organic material is left to ferment in the wall. The clean up for that can far exceed the cost of professional removal.”
On Thursday, Schempp and his assistant, John Reed calmed the bees by filling the attic with liquid smoke and removed them with a specially designed vacuum. Along with the 30,000 bees, Schempp said he removed about 25 pounds of honey and nectar on the comb and from under the floorboards of the attic, which unfortunately was unsuitable for consumption because it was cover with dust and home insulation.A comb this size and this active could have caused huge problems for this structure,” Schempp said. “It would have continued to get bigger and bigger inside the walls.”
A syndrome known as Colony Collapse Disorder began to worry scientists six years ago. Entomologists estimated that between 50 and 90 percent of the world’s feral honeybee population had started to disappear. Theories for their disappearance included the effects of decades of urbanization, pesticides, and parasitic mites.
Brought by early colonists, honeybees are a nonnative species that is responsible for pollinating up to a third of U.S. crops. While no precise figure is available, crops dependent on honeybee pollination including apples, peaches, blackberries, cucumbers, almonds, strawberries, and other fruits and vegetables and have a total annual value in the tens of billions of dollars, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
A couple in Cape May, N.J. said they've finally solved the mystery of the strange vibrations that have been shaking their home: they found a giant honeycomb and 30,000 bees in their attic crawl space.
Victoria Clayton and Richard White, who live at a former bed-and-breakfast, said they recently noticed a high amount of honeybees in their garden that they tracked to their third-floor laundry vent, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.
According to the publication, the couple called in Gary Schempp, founder of the insect rescue group Busy Bees NJ, to check out the attic. That's when their industrious visitors, and their 3-foot by 2-foot hive, were discovered.
The couple said they didn't want the bees exterminated, so Schempp and an assistant engulfed the tiny space with liquid smoke to calm the bees and removed them with a specially designed vacuum. Along with the bees, Schempp said he removed about 25 pounds of honey and nectar on the comb and from under the floorboards -- which was unsuitable for consumption.
"A comb this size and this active could have caused huge problems for this structure," Schempp told the newspaper. "It would have continued to get bigger and bigger inside the walls."
The bees were then taken to their new home on Schempp's farm.
A New Jersey couple who noticed an unusual number of honeybees in their garden said they found a honeycomb and 30,000 of the insects in their attic crawl space.

Victoria Clayton and Richard White, who live at a former bed and breakfast on Washington Street in Cape May, said they noticed many of the bees from their garden were entering their home through a third-floor laundry vent and they soon found there was a honeycomb in the attic crawl space with 30,000 honeybees tending to it, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Monday.

The couple enlisted the help of Gary Schempp, 57, founder of insect rescue group Busy Bees NJ, to relocate the insects.

Schempp said he and his assistant, John Reed, first poured some liquid smoke into the crawlspace, which caused the bees to believe the home was on fire and gorge themselves on honey until they were docile.
For anyone with a bee allergy, welcome to your worst nightmare.
On Thursday, a bee expert spent most of the day removing an enormous honeycomb housing around 30,000 honeybees from a circa 1866 house in Cape May, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.
The Washington Street former bed-and-breakfast owned by Victoria Clayton, 52, and her boyfriend was discovered to be infested with buzzing creatures after Clayton noticed an unusually large amount of bees in the home's garden, as well as a steady stream of insects headed for the third-floor laundry vent, the Inquirer wrote.
Clayton told the Inquirer that wildlife has always seemed to be attracted to the old house, including possums, raccoons and small black birds.


Bees attic Cape May Rating: 4.5 Diposkan Oleh: Arm Aritn

0 comments:

Post a Comment

My Blog List