Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Five Romney running mates

Five Romney running mates

Five Romney running mates, Five potential Romney running mates,Now that Mitt Romney has essentially locked up the Republican presidential nomination, whom might he choose as a running mate?

-This popular governor has been chided for his weight and lauded for his straight-talking style.

-This Cuban-American senator might bring a fresh face to the Republican ticket.

-This senator might help Romney lock up a key state.

-Many social conservatives are urging Romney to choose this ex-rival

-This potential running mate was a Democrat until 1982, but then switched affiliations, eventually serving in former President George W. Bush' s administration.It’s over. Mitt Romney is almost a mathematical certainty to be the Republican nominee. He hasn’t yet clinched the nomination, but it’s hard to see a scenario where the former Massachusetts governor isn’t at the top of the GOP ticket in November. The suspense now shifts to who Romney will select as a running mate. Will he try to shore up his standing with women or Hispanics? Perhaps try to win over voters in crucial swing states? Or maybe he’ll just double down on his strength and select another boring white guy with an air of competence?No one knows exactly what Romney is thinking. But turning to his favored method—market-based solutions—here are his top five likely Republican vice presidential contenders, according to Intrade, the online futures market.

1. Marco Rubio

The freshman senator from Florida currently is the most likely vice presidential contender on Intrade, with a 24.9 percent chance of being Romney’s pick. Rubio is a young, charismatic Cuban-American from a crucial swing state where he is beloved by conservatives. Rubio does have some weaknesses. He has spent less than two years as a statewide elected official—exactly as much time as Sarah Palin had in 2008. Further, Rubio spent part of his youth as a Mormon, which gives pause to some evangelicals. And, unlike Romney, favors a version of the DREAM Act, which would allow certain illegal immigrants who arrived in the United States as children an opportunity to become citizens.

2. Chris Christie

Sometimes a vice presidential nominee is used as a way to reach out to swing voters. Sometimes, the number two spot on the ticket is used to reassure the base. Chris Christie is the rare candidate who can do both. The boisterous, belligerent governor of New Jersey, currently given a 10.9 percent chance of being Romney’s choice, is revered by base voters for his tough stance against unions, but is socially moderate enough to appeal to many centrists.

Christie, though, has said openly that he’s not ready to be president, which may make some hesitate to putting him a heartbeat from the Oval Office. He also is the antithesis of Romney as a candidate. He is prone to ad-libbing, and has difficulties sticking to a script. In a political cycle when an off-the-cuff remark from an aide about an Etch a Sketch can cause a week-long media frenzy, the risks of such “straight talk” are magnified.

3. Bob McDonnell

As a social conservative from a swing state, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell could serve two roles for Romney. He would appease right-wingers nationally who worry that Romney is “a Massachusetts moderate” while bolstering the campaign in the Old Dominion.But while McDonnell may be given 9.9 percent odds on Intrade, he may be too much of a social conservative. During his gubernatorial run in 2009, McDonnell saw his graduate thesis from Regent University emerge—and receive some scrutiny. Although the document didn’t cost him the race in a strong Republican year, his controversial views on contraception and “fornicators” may be too toxic for some general-election voters.

4. Paul Ryan

Regardless of whether Paul Ryan is on the Republican ticket, he will be a key figure in the fall campaign. The Ryan Plan, named after the 42-year-old, seven-term congressman from southern Wisconsin, will be a focal point of the presidential election. This controversial program involves major cuts to virtually every single government program as a way to both pay down the deficit and significantly cut taxes.

Romney already has endorsed the Ryan Plan, as has the Republican Party en masse, but putting Ryan on the ticket would reinforce the salience of the issue. Although Ryan is personable and has a rapport with Romney, he would have to give up his seat in the House for a vice presidential bid, which could make it less tempting for him to sign up—and is one of the reason Intrade has him at just 8.9 percent.

5. Rob Portman

Rob Portman is a dull and uncharismatic fiscal conservative, just like Mitt Romney. But Portman comes from the crucial swing state of Ohio, and his political operation is credited by some for putting Romney over the top in that state’s hard-fought Super Tuesday primary against Rick Santorum. The result has generated some buzz for Portman as the safe and steady choice for the number two spot, and garnered him an 8.4 percent chance on Intrade of being picked.

The first-term Ohio senator also is a long-time Washington insider, having served 12 years in Congress before joining the Bush administration. Such inside-the-Beltway ties run counter to Romney’s message as a problem solver from outside of Washington.

Romney, though, need not pick any of these five contenders as his running mate. There are a range of other possibilities, such as Hispanic or swing-state governors Susana Martinez and Brian Sandoval, and Sarah Palin favorite—first-term Florida Congressman Allen West. Judging by past history, the GOP nominee could be someone totally out of the blue, just as Palin was four years ago and Dick Cheney and Jack Kemp were before that. One thing that does seem fair to say is that the odds are strongly against the former Alaska governor surprising anyone again with an appearance on the ticket. But if you disagree, Intrade will betcha.
Sen. John McCain joked on CBS "This Morning" Wednesday that Sarah Palin might make a good vice presidential running mate for Mitt Romney. On Tuesday, Sarah Palin suggested that Romney ought to "go rogue" and pick Florida Rep. Allen West for his veep.Florida Sen. Marco Rubio is still the heavy favorite to be the Republican vice presidential nominee - at least, according to the online betting site Intrade. Rubio’s odds are currently hovering at around 27 percent, far ahead of all other names being bandied about, such as New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (10 percent), Ohio Sen. Rob Portman (9 percent) and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan (6 percent).More than any other, Ryan seems to embody the right combination of seriousness, impeccable conservative credentials, and a useful regional affiliation. He is safer than Rubio or Martinez but not as boring as Portman or Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell; he would complement Romney (and this is, of course, assuming Romney is the eventual nominee) without overshadowing him. Perhaps most important, Ryan would bring an authenticity and a kind of political courage to the ticket - embodied in his willingness to make tough choices when it comes to entitlement reform - that Romney has seemed to lack.

One piece of evidence that Ryan’s vice presidential stock is indeed rising: President Obama is attacking him. In remarks at an Associated Press luncheon Tuesday, excerpts of which were released in advance by the White House, Obama ripped into Ryan’s budget plan as “thinly-veiled Social Darwinism.” Obama surrogates have begun referring to the “Romney-Ryan budget,” while the DNC released an online attack ad putting the two men in a Valentine’s heart to a spoof of the tune “That’s Amore.” (For what it’s worth, the ad uses Ryan’s comments from his appearance at a recent Monitor breakfast, in which he praised Romney’s entitlement speech as “very good.”
If Mitt Romney wins the Republican presidential nomination, he'll have many options for a running mate. His current rival, Rick Santorum, probably won't be one of them.
Romney said as much Monday when Neil Cavuto asked him on Fox Business if he would choose a candidate to his right in order to win the election.
"Well that would preclude, of course, Rick Santorum," Romney said. "Because, I mean, look at his record. I find it interesting that he continues to describe himself as the real conservative. This is the guy who voted against the right to work, this is the guy who voted to fund Planned Parenthood, this is the person who voted to raise the debt ceiling five times. ... It's my way of saying that Rick Santorum is not a person who is an economic conservative, to my right. I'm saying I'm a conservative, I give him credit for being a conservative, but not a fiscal conservative. His record does not suggest he's got the fiscal conservative chops that I have."
The U.S. news media are rife with speculation about Marco Rubio, Paul Ryan, Chris Christie, Susana Martinez, Bob McDonnell or Rob Portman as possible running mates for Mitt Romney.

It’s the time of the political season when conjecture runs wild, much of it ill-informed. Mr. Romney’s choice of a vice-presidential candidate will evolve, in ways unforeseeable today, over the next four months.

In weighing the reliability of columns or stories that tell you Mr. Romney is most comfortable with Mr. Ryan, the Wisconsin congressman and budget policy wonk, or that Mr. Rubio, the young Cuban-American freshman senator from Florida, is the linchpin to the Latino vote, consider these examples from recent elections: In April 2000, the leading Democratic contenders were supposed to be Senators John Kerry of Massachusetts or John Edwards of North Carolina. The nominee, Vice President Al Gore, did pick a Democratic senator: Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut.

Five Romney running mates Rating: 4.5 Diposkan Oleh: Arm Aritn

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